DESIS in the Mirror is online
Call for participation: join the NETWORK FOR VISION -  N4V research project!


  • by Anna Meroni
    Dear all, it’s a great pleasure to announce that DESIS has now become a cultural association, within the meaning of Art. 36 Italian Civil Code. The Art.1 of our new Statute affirms that our purpose “is to promote design for social innovation in higher education institutions with design discipline so as to generate useful design knowledge and to create meaningful social changes in collaboration with other stakeholders. The Association pursues its purpose by supporting the scientific research in the field of the design fostering and maintaining the exchange of scientific information and views among the members and with other institutions, exchange of scientists, promotion of young scientists (doctoral students) and use of existing research infrastructures.

  • by Ezio Manzini
    The notion of design for social innovation is frequently considered similar, if not coincident, with the one of social design. In my view, to do that is an error: the two expressions refer to different activities and have very different implications. The problem begins with the double meaning commonly attributed to the adjective “social”. One of them, that is also the one used in the expression design for social innovation, indicates that we refer to something concerning social forms. That is, concerning the way in which a society is built. The other one, instead, indicates the existence of particularly problematic situations (such as extreme poverty, illness or exclusion, and circumstances after catastrophic events) to which both the market and the state fail in finding solutions. In other words, when used in this way, “social” becomes a synonym for “very problematic condition”, which poses (or should pose) the need for urgent intervention, outside normal market or public service modalities. It is with this meaning that this adjective made its entrance into the design debate several decades ago, generating the expression: social design.

SIMPACT - Kick Off Meeting

SIMPACT with its 11 partners from nine European countries advances the understanding of social innovation’s economic dimensions, creates new concepts, models and instruments for policy makers, innovators, investors and intermediaries. It systematically investigates how social innovations can enable the most vulnerable in society to become economic assets, integrating critical analysis of current and previous work with future-oriented methodologies, new actionable knowledge and continual stakeholder participation.

Public & Collaborative: Designing Services for Housing

Within the activities of the Public and Collaborative DESIS Cluster, it has been published the 80-page report, created in partnership with the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development

The 3rd DESIS Japan Meeting Tokyo, 30/11-1/12/2013

The establishment of a sustainable society on a global scale is an urgent challenge for today’s society. Bold social reforms are thus sought to accomplish this. DESIS is a worldwide network which has been organized to play an important role in the recognition and promotion of design with regard to this.

TRANSITIONS: Project announcement and calls for Social Innovation proposals to be scaled up in 6 Scaling Centres

Dear DESIS community,
we are delighted to announce that the POLIMI-DESIS Lab is one of the consortium partners of TRANSITION - Transnational Network for Social Innovation Incubation, a 30-month 7FP-EU funded project aiming at scaling up 300 Social Innovations across Europe.

BI-CITY Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture Shenzhen

Do not miss the opportunity to visit the section “Designing the Urban-Rural Interaction”, curated by Lou Yongqi, of the Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture. It is an amazing collection of projects to connect the city to the agricultural countryside in the name of sustainability of food and life.

Pages

The full series of open lectures are available at DESIS Public & Collaborative initiative website (http://www.desis-clusters.org). 

Subscribe to DESIS Network RSS